Archive for November, 2008

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Small Groups-The Heart of the Church

November 13, 2008

Recently, I have been in a number of discussions involving Small Groups in our church as well as how they’ve worked out in other churches. Through some prayer and thought, there was a model that struck me as a perfect analogy.  Consider for a moment the chart below depicting the human circulatory system.

conmapf2

I am one who considers all things God made to be intentional and with purpose.  Considering the amount of focus and attention He paid to His new creation, Adam, I can’t help but to think this design was a map for other creations He had in mind.  Consider this equation or formula:

circluatory

So, that would mean the following could be true:church-is

small-group-1

Take a moment to consider that the heart, the center of the circulatory system, is nothing without the simple red blood cell.  Go back to your elementary learning days and remember that it takes a lot of cells to make a muscle, and a lot of muscles to make an organ and etc.  Well, the heart is the muscle, comprised of millions of red blood cells-the building blocks if you will.  Sidebar: Just those statements make it hard for me to understand how anyone can underestimate or reason out a truly divine and heavenly God.  I digress.

Let’s just assume or speculate for a second that God, in His providential wisdom, designed the human body as He wanted to see the church (His body) designed.  After all, are we not made in the image and likeness of God?  So with this in mind, if the church is the “heart” of the circulating of the Gospel as commissioned in Christ’s Great Commission, should we not look at what should actually comprise the church?  You guessed it!  The Christian Small Group!

So, starting from the fundamental, cellular level of the church, let’s look at the small group.  What is part of it?  What goes into it?  We will get into the schematics of the small groups in this new series.  For all of you who have some experience in small groups (good and bad) please vote on the poll below.  I invite your comments.

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About the Writer:

me21

Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

As a husband and father of three, Trent Cotton has a passion surrounding the role Christian Men are to play in their families, communities, churches and businesses.  This particular blog is dedicated to helping men take back the role that we have lost in society.

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Coaching-Prescription for Performance.

November 13, 2008

So you have been witnessing your team’s performance and have noticed some things needing attention.  Let’s say you have one or two team members who just are not performing as well as you thought they should be.  What do you do?  So the diagnosis is in, what is the prescription? Basically, if you were to look at it from a business decision, you have one of the following 3 options to choose from:

Coach Over

Coach Up

Coach Out

Let’s look at each of these critical steps.


coachup Coach Up

1. First diagnose the problem or the zone. What caused it?

2. Set a time to speak with the individual candidly, do they want to change? (remember the COLOR Signature)

3. Set an action plan that both of you agree upon

4. Meet regularly to surmise the results

5. Check regularly to ensure buy in

6. This mode is usually a time when you are having to apply some diplomatic pressure for performance.

coachoverCoach Over


1. Most of the time, if they are passionate, just not about their particular portion, it may simply be a mismatch of talent.

2. Set a time to speak with the individual candidly, do they want to change? (remember COLOR)

3. Set an action plan that both of you agree upon

4. Meet regularly to surmise the results

5. Check regularly to ensure buy in

6. This mode is usually a time when you are having to apply some diplomatic pressure for performance.

coachoutCoach Out

1. Not always the easiest to do, but sometimes it HAS to be done.

2. If someone is unwilling to move, you have a responsibility to protect the flock

3. Set a time to speak and remember, be candid

4. You may be shutting a door for God to open for them later

5. Be swift, this is dead wood and will slow you down.

exclamation

Although an experienced leader can most likely look quickly at the situation and be able to judge exactly what to do, it is very important for you to stop and prayerfully discern what the situation really is.  After all, if we simply act on a hunch or our own cognition, then what would separate us from the “real world?”  We are to be beacons and using this process in a Christian and professional manner, we can continue to help show others Christ through our leadership.

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Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

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SERVANT Leadership- A is for Accessible

November 12, 2008

Of all the SERVANT Leadership traits, this has to be one of the most difficult to address.  Why?  Well, this is one of those traits that has to have an absolute balance, there’s no wiggle room.  First, let’s look at some of the characteristics of an Accessible Leader :

  • One word- COMMUNICATOR
  • Responds to every voice mail or email
  • As a leader, they have a passion and focus to recognize all attempts to communicate with them.
  • This is the leader who will respond to emails or send out emails late at night or early in the morning
  • Driven by the need felt for their advice on a subject-which is one of the reasons they are so addicted to responding to everyone.
  • Out of a crowd, this person will often be cornered for long periods of time by individuals wanting to speak with them.

42-17526725Accessible Leaders are most likely going to be your most visible; after all, they love people!  Chances are, your most Accessible Leader are considered Yellows on the Colorful Masterpiece scale.  (If you are unfamiliar with this, please refer to the Colorful Masterpiece series or click here.)  One of the great aspects or traits of an Accessible Leader is that they seem to have a pretty good idea of what is going on in their organization and more importantly, on their team. You know these types!  They have the blackberry in their hand typing a message while listening to a group conversation to be able to make a comment and all the while, making a note to themselves to follow up with someone else about that “thing” they were to discuss.  Whoa… did your head spin during all of that?

Granted, there are some people who are great at this and have it mastered.  Chances are, if you are reading this, you do not do so well in this area.  Perhaps you are one who is owned by your communication time lines and gadgets.  If you are unsure, let me ask you this question, does it kill you to know that there are emails you have not yet answered?  Or how about this.  If you were to lose your PDA or messaging device, would you lose your mind until you get back on track or would you simply take your time and be cool about it?  If the mere questions before this sent a chill up your spine or caused a spike in your heart rate, chances are, you are addicted to your communication.  This is the result of an Accessible Leader being “too accessible.”

office_gear_narrowweb__200x2626

And for those of you laughing at the readers categorized above, now it is your turn.  If you are not bothered as much or at all when you are unable to return an email or answer someone’s question, this is not the best thing either. As a leader, you need to have a great communication avenue not only with your peers, but more importantly, with your staff.  One of the greatest causes of discontent in the workplace are employees who feel as if they work for the Wizard of Oz.  (you know, the man behind the curtain with the big voice)  It is always good to have a stable balance with honoring your position but also remembering who you are to serve as a leader.

If you were to grade yourself in this area and would declare this was your lowest score on a self assessment, I would consider implementing some of the following:

  • This is a tricky one because you want to be accessible and approachable to all, but not to the point that you strangle other needed qualities.
  • Set an attainable bar or expectations for follow up and interaction with your staff first, and then with everyone else.  This could be something as simply as a before 2pm = Sundown Rule.  Simply put, if someone leaves you a voice mail or sends and email, you will return it by sundown that same day.  Even if this means you simply call/say/email, “I will get back to you, today has been crazy.”
  • If group interaction intimidates or scares you, be sure to slowly expose yourself to more situations that will put you outside of your comfort zone.

If we were to ask your team to grade you in this area and this would be the lowest grade on your survey, this could mean a variety of things:

  • Your team does not approve of your follow up skills
  • Perhaps you are too busy or too “stuffy” or “lofty” in your presence that may discourage your team from speaking with you openly.
  • Chain of command is a great thing, especially for a large staff, but you still want to somehow convey that you are approachable.

In the beginning of this post, I mentioned this was the hardest topic of the SERVANT Leadership series.  Let me give you a reason in list form.  When I was sitting down to write a “top reasons list”, this is what I came up with:

1.  Be an Accessible Leader, but do not let your communication style, tactics, needs, etc overtake you.

2.  Accessible Leaders need to be approachable, yet they have to have boundries considering time, place, etc

3.  The team of an Accessible Leader should feel able to bring topics to the leader, yet still respect the chain of command

4.  Leaders cannot simple lead the battle from the hill, but also cannot spend the entire time on the front lines.  Learn how to and when to delegate.

5.  Being accessible to your team allows you to bond, coach, and observe them, however, it can also consume your day, break your concentration, and monopolize your schedule.

So, if you are truly wanting to be an Accessible Leader, I would stress this more in this topic than others, achieve BALANCE!!!!  Again, this is a great trait to have and I would argue, a necessary trait to have if you are to be an effective SERVANT Leader.  If we look to Jesus as the ultimate example of being an Accessible Leader, we would find several times where he would separate himself for prayer, but it was after mingling with his flock.  He met people on their level and like the woman with the hemorrhage, he gave everyone their moment.  For this reason, and for so many more, Jesus had a following.  People loved him because he was accessible, but even Jesus put necessary parameters in place.  If you are struggling either as or struggling to be more of an Accessible Leader, I would definitely look to Christ, the Perfecter of this and every other great trait.

If you are interested in learning more about the SERVANT Leadership series, please contact Christian Management Consulting. We offer a complete training on this and many more topics. Typically, we provide you with a test to measure your key signatures in each of the SERVANT Leadership areas. A survey would also be sent out to your team/direct reports to provide feedback on your performance and behaviors in all of the SERVANT Leadership areas as well. We will go over the key signatures as well as the positive and negative extremes of each in one-day training with you and other leaders in your area. Once we go over the signatures, from a high level, we will provide you with your results and spend some time going over how to read your personalized chart. We will also provide some time for you to personally review your results and reconvene to go over questions.

Once the training has been completed, Christian Management Consulting will meet with you regularly via phone to discuss your progress and to walk alongside you in this time of development. At the end of six months or one year, we will resend the test to you and your team to measure the changes in your behavior and make modifications to our plan.

This is a great program and a great way for any organization to implement succession strategies and train both their current and up and coming leaders.

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About the Writer:

me21

Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

As a husband and father of three, Trent Cotton has a passion surrounding the role Christian Men are to play in their families, communities, churches and businesses.  This particular blog is dedicated to helping men take back the role that we have lost in society.

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SERVANT Leadership- V for Visionary

November 10, 2008

Continuing our series on Servant Leadership, we come to V which is for Visionary.  If there were one trait that was most likely one to jump into your head when you thought about Servant Leadership, it was most likely not Visionary.  If you were to truly sit down and think about Servant Leadership, it would make sense why someone would need to be considered a visionary.  Before we get into that discussion, let’s take a moment to look at some characteristics of a Visionary Leader:

lookingaheadCharacteristics of a Visionary Leader:

•One word- ENERGY •This person has a mind always focused on the future and what-if situations.

•Paired with a strategic thinker, this person can be the mouthpiece or cheerleader for an objective.

•As leaders, they also look for creative ways to connect their organizations to the world around them, exploring and imagining new forms of partnership and alliances that will support their missions and advance in their strategic plans

•Risk takers

•As leaders, they also have a deep appreciation of the strength of diversity, understanding that diversity helps to assure a higher level of responsiveness to clients and also promotes creativity, innovation and organizational learning

These leaders are characteristically those leaders most individuals enjoy following.  Of course, they have their faults, but visionaries bring energy and vibrance to the mission at hand.  They usually help others be able to look beyond just a simple problem and look more to the solution, all the while, sharing some excitement about how the team is going to get there.  This is not only am must have for most leadership positions, but it is a great trait to have when you are tackling particularly tough morale on a team.

Of course, as I eluded earlier, there are negative points to having a Visionary leader.  Let’s look at some of the drawbacks:

•These leaders usually run from one project to another without truly accomplishing anything.  Because of  this, they must have a strong support team to carry out completion and allow the leader to focus their energy elsewhere.  This may not be a luxury to be had for some teams, so again, balance is key.

•Most of the time, the Visionary leader can be accused of having their heads in the clouds all of the time… almost unrealistic.

•So much energy, so little focus.

Now, if you find yourself struggling to be a Visionary leader, there are some things you can work on to increase in this area:

•Dream more and share your passion

•Spend more time in the Word, studying visionary leaders

•Pray, have quiet time and ask for discernment on God’s vision for your organization.

•If your team has indicated this is an area for you to work on, your team is telling you that it wants to know what God has put on your heart for the organization.  Find it, Embrace it, and Communicate it.

Being a Visionary would put you in line with some of the greats from Scripture.  David, Moses, Joshua, Solomon, and the list goes on.  In one of our next blog posts, we will discuss the how being a Visionary and being a SERVANT Leader are synonymous.

Are you a Visionary Leader?  If you would like to learn more about Servant Leadership, please be sure to contact Christian Management Consulting.  We offer a 360 degree view of Servant Leadership.  Check us out so we can get started on your Christian Leadership Development today.

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About the Writer:

me21

Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

As a husband and father of three, Trent Cotton has a passion surrounding the role Christian Men are to play in their families, communities, churches and businesses.  This particular blog is dedicated to helping men take back the role that we have lost in society.

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Leading through Turbulence- Moses

November 7, 2008

untitledIf there were ever a sign that the Israelite nation should have seen after crossing the Red Sea, I would imagine it should have looked something like this sign!  Granted, they had just witnessed a miracle of miracles and been heroically saved from the grips of their enemy Pharaoh, but the days of true trial were ahead.

In many situations, as a leader, you may identify with Moses.  What would some of the similarities be?  As yourself these questions:

1.  Have you ever been forced to lead a group of people who constantly grumbled and complained about everything?

2. Have you ever led, convinced you were doing God’s will, but couldn’t help fighting the feeling that you were passing around the same mountain?

3.  Did you ever get tired of constantly having to prove your leadership and discernment to a group of people you were leading?  Only to have to do it again?  and again?  and yet again?

Well, if you answered yes to even one of the above, you can identify with Moses.  Let’s not forget that Moses was no spring chicken when God called him to this great task of freedom.  Most 80 year olds today enjoy peaceful retirement, but Moses was told to take off his sandals and put on his walking shoes.  If ever there were a leader who could identify with leading during a turbulent time, it would be Moses.

I could not help but to hear a hint of joy in President Bush’s voice the other night during his congratulatory speech to the new president elect.  If I were in W’s shoes, I cannot say that I would not also be overjoyed with the idea of no longer having to lead a country of grumbling people and constantly live in the state of “never doing anything right.”  In the span of 8 years, Bush has had to lead a country who has witnessed a horrific attack on New York, a Stock Market crash (after 9/11), the burst of mortgage growth and the housing market, the fall of the mortgage industry and housing market, national banks failing left and right, two wars on two different fronts, need I go on?  That list is enough to wear on any leader.  So what are we to do if we find ourselves leading during the most turbulent of times?

If we were to follow Moses, there are a couple of simple ideas to implement for success.

moses-holding-up-his-arms-during-the-battle1.  Quiet time with God–  If you were to read of the chronicles of Moses, you would find there are numerous references to Moses ascending to the mountain of God.  In fact, Moses is known as the “friend of God” because of his humility and his focus on God.  For Moses, I would imagine this was one of the habits that kept him on track and not wanting to simply violate one of the commandments and be done with the whole grumbling tribe.  Through his quiet time with God, Moses was able to discern his direction, receive blessing, and get his focus back onto God’s plan.  What a simple habit that most of us look over due to the business we call life.

2.  Persistence with the Plan–  Moses did not know where the Promise Land was exactly, but he did know that God would lead them there.  That is what Moses focused on.  When others were wanting to turn back and give up, Moses stuck to the plan-God’s Providence.

3.  Surround yourself with Godly Council–  Moses sought most of his direction from God, but there were those like Aaron and Joshua who built him up as well.  They were his council of sorts, those who protected him from being so worn by the day to day management of the group.  Surrounding yourself with Godly council will most of the time provide you the little boost you need on those days you feel you do not have any more to give.  Moses sought peace in their presence to just be Moses.  We all need that from time to time.  Also, one important trait of Godly council is that they can recognize when it is time for you to pray and will tell you so.  This is a great thing to have when you are facing battles on every front.  Not only should you have a group that prays for you and pushes you along, it’s good that they take the time to push you to honor the first principle we discussed.

With all of the news about the layoffs, the market crashing, international woes, or even just the fact that your car didn’t start today, it’s good to know that God gave us leaders to look to.  Although they were not perfect, they did seek his heart and were noted in His book.  I believe I am going to try to be more like Moses and honor the three principles above.  Maybe by focussing more on God, I will focus less on what’s going on around me!  That is true Christian Leadership!

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About the Writer:

me21

Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

As a husband and father of three, Trent Cotton has a passion surrounding the role Christian Men are to play in their families, communities, churches and businesses.  This particular blog is dedicated to helping men take back the role that we have lost in society.

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Your Biblical Blue

November 6, 2008

I know if you are labeled as a Blue, you have spent some time wondering/analyzing why it has taken so long for me to get to you all!  Well, after a great deal of thought and consideration of several notable Blues in Scripture, I have decided on one definite Blue… St. Thomas.

thomasSt. Thomas is most notably known for who one statement that has put him in the hall of fame as a Blue.  A week after the Reseurection, the other disciples were praying in the upper room when the Risen Christ appeared to them.  Who was gone… Thomas.  Where was he?  Well, if he is a true Blue, he was most likely somewhere thinking!  Regardless of his location, he was not there to actually witness the Risen Christ. So upon his return, the disciples began telling him how Christ had appeared to them.  What was Thomas’s response?  Spoken like a true Blue, Thomas basically says, “I will not believe until I see him with my own eyes and place my fingers in his wounds.”

So what about this statement makes Thomas a Blue? In most circumstances, your Blue personality type will want to see actual proof of just about everything.  One of their strengths and weaknesses is their ability to analyze situations.  At times, this is a strength and was for Thomas earlier in the Gospel when he was ready to go and die with Jesus.  Why did he believe so much in Christ that time?  Christ was real for him, he saw the miracles every day and he must have deducted that beyond the obvious facts presented to him combined with his feelings, Christ had to be the Messiah.

Now, another great trait possessed by the Blue personality that can be both a strength and a weakness is their stubborn nature.  Using the two examples above proves this point.  On one hand, Thomas’s stubbornness to follow Christ, even if it meant death shows how die-hard Blues can be in their faith life.  This is a great trait to have since once a Blue truly understands and can fully embrace (logically) the Gospel, there is no turning back for them.  They are resolve in their belief and sometimes, that’s just it for them.  No swaying.

However, one hang up in the process of their embracing the Gospel can be this same stubbornness.  Thomas was not going to believe Christ rose until he had absolute proof.  The wonderful part of this story is that out of this trait, Christ uses Thomas’s seeming fault to redeem those of us who are believers.  Thomas believed because he saw, but Christ promises even more for those of us who believe without seeing.

So, a great THANK YOU to the Blues of the world for in your strength and weakness.  Because of Thomas’s Blue tendencies, we are able to see the two different types of believers both now and then.  After reading this post, which side of the fence are you on?  Are you still trying to “see” or do you simply believe?

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About the Writer:

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Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

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Christian Confrontation-Be Bold

November 4, 2008

6 “Be strong and courageous, because you will lead these people to inherit the land I swore to their forefathers to give them. 7 Be strong and very courageous. Be careful to obey all the law my servant Moses gave you; do not turn from it to the right or to the left, that you may be successful wherever you go. 8 Do not let this Book of the Law depart from your mouth; meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do everything written in it. Then you will be prosperous and successful. 9 Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be terrified; do not be discouraged, for the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go.”

If you ever wanted to study a leader, Joshua would be a great place to start. In fact, we will be starting a series on Effective Christian Leadership that studies the principles of leadership provided in the book of Joshua, mostly in the first couple of verses. With this said, however, let us focus our thoughts on Christian Confrontation. What is it? How do we do it? What is the right way and wrong way? When do we do it?

Well, if we were to look at a leader or someone in the professional role of leading in early Scripture, I would think Joshua would give us a great lesson on conflict. He was the man who hung on the very words of God. Remember, out of the spies sent into Jericho, he was one of two who actually reported back all about the city, but clung more to the promise of God’s victory over what he saw. As a leader, Joshua had to be terrified knowing he was to lead the people to the Promised Land. As a warrior, Joshua knew there would be plenty of battles ahead of him… conflicts if you will. So let us look at one precept that God was determined to get into Joshua’s head before the Christian Confrontation began. In fact, God was so determined to help Joshua learn this point; he directly mentioned it three times in the span of three verses. Don’t you love serving and intentional God?

Be strong and courageous

Three times God tells Joshua to be strong and courageous. And how does this play into Effective Christian Leadership and Christian Confrontation? So many Christians fall into the trap of thinking we are to shrink from our enemy and simply remain humble in our approach. This is a bone of contention for me, perhaps because I am a Red Key Signature Personality. Regardless of the reason, I base my argument on the simple fact that it is called spiritual warfare, not spiritual negotiation. Confrontation is a part of life for everyone, nonbeliever and believer alike. However, as a believer, I am to ensure my approach is more along the lines of Christian Confrontation versus the worldly approach of “blow them out of the water.” So, as a rule, God gave Joshua the order to be strong and courageous. What would this look like?

  1. Sometimes, the truth hurts. As a Christian, I find it most difficult to hold those close to me accountable. Sure, I could simply take the Nazi approach and brow-beat them into submission, or I could let them simply go on as they would normally without me saying anything. These are two extremes… strength and courage would provide me balance. As a Christian, I should provide an example in my life, however, not be too afraid to call my friend’s actions to the light.. in truth and love of course.
  2. Effective Christian Leadership requires strength. There are going to be times where as a Christian Leader, you will want to run and hide. However, like Joshua, you will be asked to step up and in these moments, true leaders are seen. For example, we saw the true strength of Peter when the time came to tell the Gospel at the risk of his life. We saw David confess his sin and stand to be the king God had desired him to be. Both men underwent significant trials, but because of the fire they survived, they are now known as great leaders for us to follow.
  3. Be Bold, Be Direct, and Be Loving. This is hard for most dominant leaders since they merely want to get to the point and get it over with. I would agree there is some love in being direct, especially when it comes to bad news. With this said, however, let’s not always be so direct that we lose sight of the fact that it is people we are leading, not machines. Christ put us in leadership positions and like he instructed Peter, we are to care, tend to, and love his flock. Our leadership is to be bold in that we acknowledge our strength in Christ alone. This is not something we should neither hide behind nor hide from. If we put on Christ, then those who believe and even some who want to believe in Him will be drawn to our leadership, only because of Christ. Be bold, be strong, be courageous is what he instructed Joshua.

Effective Christian Leadership and Christian Confrontation are two very in depth topics that we will continue to study. What are some of your experiences? Please share what you have learned as a Christian in a Leadership Role.

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About the Writer:

me21

Trent Cotton has spent a number of years in management and business consulting. After spending some time in the field, he joined the HR department, beginning in recruiting and eventually serving as the Department Head of HR for one of the major lines of business. With such a varied background, he works to bring all of these together to help churches and other Christian organizations incorporate some common business practices into their ministries to enable them to better serve the Kingdom. He currently works for SourcePointe, an HR Outsourcing Agency while continuing to own and operate Christian Management Consulting as a ministry. In his free time, he also writes a lot on Church Development as a Church Consultant.

As a husband and father of three, Trent Cotton has a passion surrounding the role Christian Men are to play in their families, communities, churches and businesses.  This particular blog is dedicated to helping men take back the role that we have lost in society.